The Side Effects Of Using Hho For Fuel

Hybrid hydrogen oxygen gas HHO is used to get you down the road while stretching the fuel budget. These fuel cells can be easily homemade and installed. These little HHO bangers effectively assist in combustion and give you more bang for your buck. There are beneficial side effects of using a homemade fuel cell. I wanted to list and explain some of them, but first I wanted to explain the right way to use HHO, and yes HHO is made from water.

Current engines gasoline and diesel have unused fuel in the combustion cycle. Matter of fact the catalytic converter (1975) was introduced to act as a catalyst and improve emissions. Part of the emissions the catalytic converter converts is unused fuel. So what’s the big deal? Well, if you use HHO not only do you increase the efficiency of the combustion cycle, giving you more bang for your buck, you also do part of the catalytic converters job. So the big deal is, you increase horsepower emit cleaner emissions and gain miles per gallon, because you used the fuel more efficiently.

This gas burns readily and the byproduct of combustion is water, not the green house gas carbon dioxide. This was an added benefit because I do believe we are damaging the environment by burning fossil fuels.

Have a custom performance exhaust shop fabricate a complete 3″ exhaust system (Turbo-to-Tip). It should cost well less that $400. And then you can use the muffler and exhaust tip of catalytic converter recyclers your choice.

It is not absolutely required, but it is a good idea. The factory by-pass valve is prone to failure, and an aftermarket BOV is probably a wise investment for preventing turbo damaging compressor surge. And it sounds cool too. However, it must be noted that if you still have the factory mass-air flow sensor, a blow-off valve, which is vented to the atmosphere, may cause stumbling between shifts.

There is some debate on this subject. There are rumors that 180 can be achieved. But by going with the numbers, 168-172mph in stock form seems possible.

Now multiply our tire’s revolving speed, by the tire’s outside circumference, and we find that the tire is covering 18,016 feet per minute, divide that by the 5280 feet in a mile, and we find we are covering 3.412 miles per minute, now multiply that by the 60 minutes in an hour, and we find we are traveling 204.7miles per hour @ 6800rpm in 6th gear. If the engines redline is increased to 7500rpm, which it often is, because of a higher flowing turbo. Then our maximum speed would be 225.8mph, given enough power of course.